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near-fatal injuries. nicole introduces us to iron heart, a real-life hero who's helping others after he, too, suffered near-fatal injuries. >> it was just a regular summer day, and i was crossing a local intersection on my way home from some practice, and i was struck in my driver's side door by a speeding dump truck, and the injuries were catastrophic. >> brian was 18 years old, a high-school honor student, and an all-star athlete. in his book, "iron heart," he tells how he was rushed to the hospital in critical condition. >> i lost a total of 60% of my blood and had to get all that replaced with 36 blood transfusions. >> we take it for granted that when we need blood, like brian did, it'll be there ready for us. but it's not as simple as that. >> our hospitals need blood for accident victims, people with blood diseases, people in need of surgeries, and if people didn't donate blood, then we wouldn't have the blood to supply to our hospitals in need. >> in fact, every two seconds, someone in the u.s. needs donated blood, but, according to the american red cross, many people who can don
. that is the same as the vatican. >> only a handful of countries voted against the move, including the u.s. and israel. both threaten to sanction palestinian request. israel today announced the construction of 3000 more settler homes in response. >> many hope it will be for step toward independence and true statehood. >> life remains the same in the palestinian territories, but many say the united nations vote has given them a new outlook. >> it is a beautiful feeling. there's hope that our children will grow up in an independent nation with its own voice, and that is a feeling that is hard to describe it. >> the decision came after a powerful appeal by the palestinian authority president in new york. >> the general assembly is called upon today to issue a birth certificate of the reality of the state of palestine. >> 138 generally assembly -- general assembly members voted in favor of upgrading palestine to the status of nonmember observers say. israel opposed the status change, saying the resolution will not help further the peace process. >> the truth is nothing will change if they cont
are playacting. but as i'll explain, it's no game. >> he used to be a hospital patient. now he's a hospital hero. i'll have that story. >> a cooking competition so fierce you can taste it. i'll report on teen chefs. >> rugby started in england long ago. no doubt the inventors of the sport would be surprised to see how it's now being played in america. >> we asked teens if they'd like to sit at this desk and handle all the responsibilities that come with it. their answers may surprise you. >> we're at madame tussauds new york getting a behind-the-scenes peek at all the work it takes to keep these life-size wax figures looking lifelike. >> and there's lots more ahead, so stay with us. >> welcome to "teen kids news." i'm mwanzaa. >> and i'm livia. here's this week's top story. >> bullying is making a lot of news nowadays. that's because it's so common. brandon tells us about an unusual program that's helping to prevent bullying. not only does it start in elementary school, it takes an approach that's rather dramatic. >> hey, listen. i wanted to talk to you about the math, 'cause... >> liz and rache
students know about our u.s. history at grades 4, 8, and 12. everything from the united states constitution to presidents to why certain laws came into play. at very different levels, there are certain questions that are asked. the 8th graders really were the ones who did, i would say, perform the best when we consider the 4th and we consider the 12th grade. >> that's because 8th graders' scores improved over the last time the test was given. 4th graders and 12th graders did not. in fact, a majority of 12th graders turned in a poor performance. their questions were harder, and their correct answers were fewer. 55% of 12th graders scored below the basic level. what does this show? >> mm, lauren, that's not good news at all. [ chuckles ] and what does that mean for our 12th graders? it means that we have to find a way to engage our 12th graders in learning u.s. history. we have to make it more important to them. so, we have a lot of work to do, definitely, at the 12th-grade level. >> there's a famous saying -- "those who don't know history are condemned to repeat it." so, the lessons of the p
, is happening to us. whatever's happening in the asian community, that's us. instead of possessive commodified investment in our identities, we need to take possessive investment in our other communities' struggles. >> the life and work of junot diaz contain many worlds, and that makes him all the more worth listening to. his imagination travels between the old and the new, between the america that was and the america we're becoming. straddling different cultures, yet american to the core -- he seems to be looking in every direction at once -- a spotter of the future, a curator of the past, a man very much of the here and now. in his first book, "drown" and in "the brief wondrous life of oscar wao" -- the novel that won him the pulitzer prize, diaz writes in short, vivid strokes of realspeak. his recent collection of short stories, "this is how you lose her," was a finalist for the national book award. diaz, the novelist, once considered becoming an historian and to this day he summons his creative gifts by looking to his own past. he was born in the dominican republic, part of that caribbean
keeps coming to mind as i try to follow the melodrama in washington that has us heading for a cliff. a fiscal cliff. but are we? or is this, another myth in the making? for some insight, we turn to two seasoned observers both of whose books you'll want to as santa to leave in your stocking. bruce bartlett was an economic adviser to the supply-side icon jack kemp, and to two presidents -- ronald reagan and the first george bush. he got into hot water with his conservative cohorts when he wrote a widely quoted book critical of the second president bush. his most recent work is "the benefit and the burden: tax reform-why we need it and what it will take." yves smith is the founder and editor of the popular blog naked capitalism. after 25 years in the financial services industry, she now heads the management consulting firm aurora advisors. she's the author of this book: "econned: how unenlightened self interest undermined democracy and corrupted capitalism." welcome to you both. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> is the fiscal cliff just a metaphor? or is it for real? >> well, the cliff is
the economy and energize japan. >> translator: i want a new cabinet to use tax-free on the tsunami survivors. i really have a high expectation about this. >> translator: i want a new administration to listen to the voices of young people and do something new because nothing really seems to have changed. >> abe takes charge as japan is embroiled in some difficult relations with its neighbors. a former u.s. official hopes the new government will rebuild regional ties and those with the u.s. former deputy secretary of state james steinberg was a leading advocate for the asia pacific region. he welcomed abe's plan to make his the first foreign destination. >> i think there's no substitute for leader to leader discussions. given the delicacy and importance of issues in east asia now. >> steinberg expressed the concerns over the senkaku islands. japan controls the islands in the east china sea. china and taiwan claim them. >> the re-elected leader in the united states and new leaders in all three major countries of northeast asia. this is an opportunity to take a step back and get a new perspectiv
of us distanced from the loss to imagine to even grieve the emptiness of the homes and hearts of those who loved them. we will never forget. we mourn, move on, and too soon forget. then it will happen again some day. we'll scratch our heads and ask ourselves, was the last time newtown or columbine? was it aurora or that college in virginia? once again, we will mourn, move on, and too soon forget. there is an old saying that in remembrance is the secret of redemption. but america forgets quickly and gives no lasting indication it seems redemption from its fetish with guns, its romance with the free market of violence, with the sport of it all. the show must go on. it's our right. at any price. what were their names again? oh, yes. charlotte, daniel, olivia, daniel, allison, dawn. poor things. such a tragedy. praise the lord and pass the ammunition. so we make our peace with violence and make ourselves over in its image. a state senator in missouri, a lifetime member of the national rifle association, is pushing a bill to require that all first graders be enrolled in the nra's gun safety
lawmakers in state after state using alec as a front. here's another example -- the american bail coalition, which represents the bail bond industry, pulls no punches about writing alec's model bills itself. in a newsletter a few years back, the coalition boasted that it had written 12 alec model bills "fortifying the commercial bail industry." here's jerry watson, senior legal counsel for the coalition, speaking at an alec meeting in 2007. he has a law to offer. >> there is a model bill for you to review if you might be interested in introducing such a measure. >> he'll even help legislators amend it. >> now, if you don't like the precise language of these suggested documents, can they be tweaked by your legislative counsel? well, absolutely. and will we work with them on that and work with you and your staff on that? absolutely. >> all the lawmakers have to do is ring him up. >> there is a phone number there for our executive offices in washington, d.c. we are prepared to help you and your staff and support this legislation in any way that we can. >> and guess what? there's gold at the en
, burlington, vermont, we used to hold press conferences. you would have four or five or six different radio stations showing up. you know, we'd be talking about the school board or the city council local issues. now if we're lucky we'll have one radio station showing up. and that's true all over the united states of america. and the point he is not right wing or even left wing. the point is that the tendency of corpoporate america is not t discuss at length the real issues that impact ordinary people. if you owned a television station, for example, do you think you'd be talking about the impact that citizens united has on the american political system, when you're receiving huge amounts of money because of citizens united? if you are general electric, which has been a major outsourcer of jobs to china and other countries, do you think you're going to be talking about trade policy in the united states of america or maybe nuclear power in the united states of america? >> but this puzzles me. the fcc tried to do essentially the same thing four years ago, as you know, in the last year of the bu
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10